Search

Toppel Peers Blog

the inside track to your career

Tag

Ali Banas

Gap Year: What’s the Deal?

By Ali Banas, Peer Advisor

So…You’re considering a gap year. This isn’t an easy decision for some, but for others it makes perfect sense. Whether you just need a break and want to gain experience in your field, you’re feeling indecisive about your path, or you know that you need time to gain insight on your career, a gap year might be right for you. There are many things you can do during this time, like traveling, working, or gaining experience. When you’re wondering if this time is right for you, consider a few things. Can you afford to live and complete your goals without scholarships or major funding from the university? Will this motivate you to return to school and help your focus? What do you want to gain from this experience? Here I will discuss a few of the most popular things to do during a gap year.

 

Research

Completing lab work while in school can be time consuming, and therefore overwhelming. The best way to get involved on campus is through professors and researchers, asking about faculty-led projects. These do not always have to be completed while in school, so it’s best to reach out and ask for opportunities that would be available to you during your gap year. If there is another research lab you were interested in, it is best to reach out and talk to representatives or organizations that lead the type of lab you are looking for. Gap years can also be a great time for networking. Get your feet wet in different types of research or see if the path you wished to take is one that would fit you well.

Shadowing

If you are in the medical field, you know how important shadowing can be. Use personal connections to spend a few days here and there shadowing the career professional of your choice, to see if this path is one you would be interested in. Medical professionals are not the only ones who offer shadow days, and students in other majors/career paths should be looking for these opportunities as well! Ask around your college, friends, professors, or advisors for helpful connections that may be able to assist you in finding a person to shadow. Shadowing during a gap year could really help you have a realistic view of what the working environments are really like.

Work

Definitely one of the most common things to do during a gap year is to work. This is a valuable way to save up some money, gain experience, and meet new people that could help shape your career. A bit more of a commitment than shadowing, this is option is great for those who are trying to become more financially stable, or those who are trying to experience their field of choice hands-on. Whether full-time or part-time, working during a gap year can be very beneficial.

Volunteer

There are so many options for volunteer experiences around the world. This can be a great way to experience different cultures while helping a good cause. Volunteering doesn’t have to be in your field, but it couldn’t hurt if it was. Volunteering can be a great resume booster while giving you experience, networking opportunities, and the opportunity for exposure to things you might not get to see otherwise.

 

There are many options to consider for a gap year, and it is important to pick what will be best for you. Consider your options, and enjoy Canes!

Take Advantage of Resources

By Ali Banas, Peer Advisor

As a freshman in college, you experience a lot of firsts. Possibly the first time living away from home, the first college courses, first finals week, on-campus living, the list goes on. It can be a lot to handle, but it can also be the start to a great experience. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed in a new sea of people who all seem to know what they are doing, and what their future plans are. The University of Miami has great resources to help students gain steady footing during this time. For me, freshman year had many firsts, including my first internship. Living out of state during a portion of the year makes finding jobs/internships very difficult, but it’s made easier with applications like Handshake, and facilities like Toppel. I may not have found my internship on Handshake, but I found lists of a dozen others I would have never found by myself. Having no past experience with resumes or applications for internships, I found myself uploading my mediocre resume to Handshake and just hoping for the best. When a Peer Advisor commented on it, I made changes, and was amazed that this service was done automatically, without me having to ask. Looking into the services offered by Toppel, I realized I needed to take a trip before sending in my application. Applications are not always straight forward. Some have what seems like endless hoops to jump through, and can drive you insane. My application was one of these. I struggled on how to get all my paperwork together, and on what the best way to complete everything was. Walking over to Toppel was nerve-wracking, because I had no idea what I even needed to ask. Going to Peer Advising seemed scary, but honestly extremely worth it. The Advisor helped answer my questions, and figured out what it was that my application needed to be considered complete. Utilizing services like this, is something that every student, not just freshman should take part in. I learned so much from my internship that I never would have guessed that I would be taking part in freshman year. It seemed so advanced, but with help on creating the best possible application, I secured my place.

It can be scary taking advantage of services that are new to you, or that you never needed in the past. But as a freshman, undergraduate, graduate student, or beyond, you learn from new experiences. You have a possibility to learn from everyone you meet, if you just take the time to. Whether it’s job applications, job searches, or questions that you didn’t even know you had, there are resources to help. Not only are there amazing career resources on campus, but there’s a resource for nearly everything you can need. Mental health, counseling, medical, social issues, on-campus living, and academic, it’s all covered. Majority of these are included in tuition, so why not take advantage of them?

Good Luck, Canes!

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑